Understanding Your Child’s Learning Style

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To help your child get the most out of their education it may be useful to identify their unique learning style and tailor exercises and activities to suit. There are three main learning styles: visual, kinaesthetic and auditory. Children will lean more towards one of these styles and deciphering which category they fall into can help to unlock their learning potential. An independent school in Buckinghamshire has shared the following information about the three-common learning, to help you maximise your child’s academic success.

Visual
Visual learners tend to retain and recall information better if they see it written down or presented to them with images or charts. They usually like things such as drawing, reading, and painting. Visual learners may struggle to concentrate on spoken explanations and find it more difficult to recall information they have heard rather than seen. Tip for visual learners: Have them create flashcards, mind maps, and brightly coloured posters when learning new information.

Kinaesthetic
Kinaesthetic learners process information best if they can be physically engaged with the subject matter. They may benefit from acting things out or creating or building things to help them retain information. Kinaesthetic learners usually enjoy sport, dance, drama or other physical activities. They may struggle with traditional, classroom-based learning methods which focus on reading, writing, or listening to verbal explanations. Tip for kinaesthetic learners: To secure fresh knowledge have them teach what they have just learned to someone else. This will allow them to actively engage with the information they are covering.

Auditory
Auditory learners are better at understanding spoken instructions than written ones and have better recall if they have heard something out loud. They generally enjoy music and singing and are often quite talkative. Auditory learners find it difficult to retain the information they have read and may find it difficult to concentrate when reading. Tip for auditory learners: Recording themselves reading out loud and then listening back to the information is a great way for auditory learners to cement their knowledge. Both speaking out loud initially and then listening back will suit their learning style and help them to understand the topic they are covering.

2 comments:

  1. I think this is something all schools need to take into account when setting out lessons so that they are beneficial to all students

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